Book Club

meets monthly

book-club.gif

St. Matthew’s Book Club is open to all interested readers and meets monthly in the Church library or Classroom C on the third Thursday of the month. Our reading selections offer a way to explore books through fellowship and discussion and are led by a different parishioner each month.  Our discussions are lively and have been thought provoking and enlightening.

Contact Holly Weise (609-737-1064) for more information or suggestions.

All are welcome!  If you are attending for the first time, please call Holly to confirm the date. The dates and selections appear below and usually appear in the Sunday bulletin and monthly newsletter.


2018 schedule

Click on a title/author below for the Amazon.com web page

Click here for our BOOK CLUB ARCHIVE of past choices.


Oct 25th - Library, 10:00 am
THE AMERICAN HEIRESS   Daisy Goodwin

The American Heiress.jpg

Traveling abroad with her mother at the turn of the twentieth century to seek a titled husband, Cora Cash, whose family mansion in Newport dwarfs the Vanderbilts', suddenly finds herself Duchess of Wareham, married to Ivo, the most eligible bachelor in England. Nothing is quite as it seems, however: Ivo is withdrawn and secretive, and the English social scene is full of traps and betrayals. Money, Cora soon learns, cannot buy everything, as she must decide what is truly worth the price in her life and her marriage. Witty, moving, and brilliantly entertaining, Cora's story m brings a fresh new spirit to the world of Edith Wharton and Henry James.


The Road from Coorain.png

This a memoir, by Jill Ker Conway, that tells the story of her astonishing journey into adulthood -- a journey that would ultimately span immense distances and encompass worlds, ideas, and ways of life that seem a century apart. She was seven before she ever saw another girl child. At eight, in the Australian outback, she was doing a "man's job" of helping herd the sheep because World War II had taken away the able-bodied men. She loved the vast unpeopled landscape, beautiful and hostile, whose uncertain weathers tormented the sheep ranchers with conflicting promises of riches and inescapable disaster. She adored her large-visioned father and her strong, radiant mother, who had gone willingly with him into a pioneering life. Jill, staggered by the loss of her father, catapulted to what seemed another planet -- the suburban Sydney of the 1950s and its crowded, noisy, cliquish school life. Later, in America, Jill Conway became a historian and the first woman president of Smith College. Her story of Coorain and the road from Coorain startles with its passion and evocative power, by its understanding of the ways in which a total, deep-rooted commitment to place -- or to a dream -- can at once liberate and imprison. It is a story of childhood as both Eden and anguish, and of growing up as a journey toward the difficult life of the free.  


Alice in Wonderland.png

Ann Chapman suggested that we read this classic children’s book.  It is even more relevant because of a discovery by Mickey Graham’s son:

“The latest discovery -- a multimedia, four-way pun in "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" that has eluded scholars since the children's classic was published 127 years ago -- was made by an unusual pair of scholars: two teen-agers from New Jersey.” -

https://www.nytimes.com/1991/05/01/books/tale-in-tail-s-a-study-worthy-of-alice-s-friends.html