Book Club

meets monthly

St. Matthew’s Book Club is open to all interested readers and meets monthly in the Church library or Classroom C on the third Thursday of the month. Our reading selections offer a way to explore books through fellowship and discussion and are led by a different parishioner each month.  Our discussions are lively and have been thought provoking and enlightening.

Contact Holly Weise (609-737-1064) for more information or suggestions.

All are welcome!  If you are attending for the first time, please call Holly to confirm the date. The dates and selections appear below and usually appear in the Sunday bulletin and monthly newsletter.


2017 schedule

Click on a title/author below for the Amazon.com web page

Click here for our Book Club Archive of past choices.


Is a literary celebration of our national parks, an exploration of what they mean to us and what we mean to them. From the Grand Tetons in Wyoming to Acadia in Maine to Big Bend in Texas and more, Williams creates a series of lyrical portraits that illuminate the unique grandeur of each place while delving into what it means to shape a landscape with its own evolutionary history into something of our own making. Part memoir, part natural history, and part social critique, The Hour of Land is a meditation and a manifesto on why wild lands matter to the soul of America.


We have two selections for July. Read one or both.

"For the better part of a week, nearly every man, woman, and child in Gander and the surrounding smaller towns stopped what they were doing so they could help. They placed their lives on hold for a group of strangers and asked for nothing in return. They affirmed the basic goodness of man at a time when it was easy to doubt such humanity still existed."When thirty-eight jetliners bound for the United States were forced to land in Gander, Newfoundland, on September 11, 2001, due to the closing of United States airspace, the citizens of this small community were called upon to come to the aid of more than six thousand displaced travelers.


During World War II, American soldiers from every city and walk of life rolled through North Platte, Nebraska, on troop trains en route to their ultimate destinations in Europe and the Pacific. The tiny town, wanting to offer the servicemen warmth and support, transformed its modest railroad depot into the North Platte Canteen.Every day of the year, every day of the war, the Canteen—staffed and funded entirely by local volunteers—was open from five a.m. until the last troop train of the day pulled away after midnight. Astonishingly, this remote plains community of only 12,000 people provided welcoming words, friendship, and baskets of food and treats to more than six million GIs by the time the war ended.


August 2017 - Vacation Break


September 21, 2017 @ 7:00 pm
Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue

Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award

One of the greatest things a novel can do is to raise empathy in a reader. Behold the Dreamers does that slowly and surely. It is a novel about marriage, immigration, class, race, and the trapdoors in the American Dream—the unforgettable story of a young Cameroonian couple making a new life in New York just as the Great Recession upends the economy.