Book Club

meets monthly

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St. Matthew’s Book Club is open to all interested readers and meets monthly in the Church library or Classroom C on the third Thursday of the month. Our reading selections offer a way to explore books through fellowship and discussion and are led by a different parishioner each month.  Our discussions are lively and have been thought provoking and enlightening.

Contact Holly Weise (609-737-1064) for more information or suggestions.

All are welcome!  If you are attending for the first time, please call Holly to confirm the date. The dates and selections appear below and usually appear in the Sunday bulletin and monthly newsletter.


2017 schedule

Click on a title/author below for the Amazon.com web page

Click here for our BOOK CLUB ARCHIVE of past choices.


The Book of Joy.jpg

"[An] exquisite book...An intimate glimpse into the minds of two of the world's spiritual guides, and their foundation for an attainable and practical approach to experiencing a more enriching and sustainable life of abundant joy."

—Shelf Awareness

"This sparkling, wise, and immediately useful gift to readers from two remarkable spiritual masters offers hope that joy is possible for everyone even in the most difficult circumstances, and describes a clear path for attaining it."

—Publishers Weekly


December 14th, 10:00 am, A Christmas Brunch at Christina Kales’
An American Childhood by Annie Dillard

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Dillard's luminous  memoir of her childhood captures growing up  in the 1950s in Pittsburg. Dillard's parents helped her acquire a love of nature and a  taut sensitivity. The events of childhood often loom larger than life; the magic of Dillard's writing is that she sets down typical childhood happenings with their original immediacy and force.


January 18, Library 10:00 am
Old Filth by Jane Gardam

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This mordantly funny novel examines the life of Sir Edward Feathers, a desiccated barrister known to colleagues and friends as Old Filth (the nickname stands for “Failed in London Try Hong Kong”). After a lucrative career in Asia, Filth settles into retirement in Dorset. With anatomical precision, Gardam reveals that, contrary to appearances, Sir Edward’s life is seething with incident: a “raj orphan,” whose mother died when he was born and whose father took no notice of him, he was shipped from Malaysia to Wales (cheaper than England) and entrusted to a foster mother who was cruel to him. What happened in the years before he settled into school, and was casually adopted by his best friend’s kindly English country family, haunts, corrodes, and quickens Filth’s heart; Gardam’s prose is so economical that no moment she describes is either gratuitous or wasted.